Author Topic: No Man's Sky  (Read 826 times)

Darkness

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No Man's Sky
« on: August 12, 2016, 03:08:56 AM »
Because there needs to be a thread for this.

Copied from Facebook.

No Man's Sky - Early Thoughts.

It is a very pretty. The planets feel suitably alien but, not outlandishly so. Some of the vistas are breathtaking and provide enough of a desire to see what is over the horizon.

Having only visited a few planets so far, I can't realy speak as to how samey the procedural generation makes things. Certain things always look the same (mineral deposits and what not) and in the early stages, concentrating on those might be making me miss differences in flora and fauna.

Finding stuff and adding new stuff to your discoveries list, to upload and get credits on, is satisfying. Having whole planets, lifeforms and locations which you've found recorded on the game servers, is pleasing. You can also rename them. There is a planet Chico out there with its moon Stinko.

The ground based exploration is fun, in a way its somewhat reminiscent on minecraft because you blast a lot of rocks. Only prettier, more varied and without the fear of the dark.

Combat vs sentinels is standard FPS stuff.

The language learning and interpreting what you need to do in respect of the wants of alien races, is fun and evolves nicely.

Controls, in game mechanics, resource and inventory management and crafting, are all very fluid. So of the menus could be clearer, as trading stuff on space stations doesn't make it obvious about switching between your exosuit and spaceship inventories.

Space - looks glorious but, so far my impressions are that this is not NMS strong suit. Flight controls on your spaceship (even the upgraded replacement you get with the limited edition) are not great, veering between unresponsive to wildly twitchy. I've seen negative reports about space combat, so I'm avoiding that for now.

Admittedly I've not spent much time in space but, compared to a planet surface, it doesn't immediately scream that there is lots to do here.

But, it is pretty.

I lost hours on it without realising.

« Last Edit: August 12, 2016, 04:21:37 AM by Darkness »
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I find him an engaging conversationalist but I wouldn't say I was "into" him. - Thrugg

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Darkness

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Re: No Man's Sky
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2016, 02:08:24 AM »
I've put more hours in. A lot more hours when I probably should be doing other things. Further thoughts.

The planets are varied but, the resources appearance is identical on all the planets I've visited so far. Some planets have certain resources which others don't but, generally speaking you won't struggle to identify what objects contain the materials you need. Only the density of resources varies, which means for some planets you will want to have a reserve of fuel isotopes (plutonium and thalium) so you can take off and warp around.

Finding all the different types lifeforms on a planet has been, for me, as frustrating as hell. There isn't a huge variety in a planets biomes and so its more or less pot luck whether you run into different creatures or not.

Planets are huge. Actually flying round them in space using the pulse engine to get to their dark side (if there is a location of interest or something located there), takes a while.

Space combat is hard. It is made harder by the fact that you don't get a targeting reticule until another ship is hostile towards you. Which means engaging in events like defending big freighter ships from pirates is an exercise in frustration as actually hitting the pirate ships to make them hostile to you, is really rather difficult. If they change nothing else about No Man's Sky, they should change how you lock onto targets. This simple change would make space combat a lot more fun.  As it stands, once you've got the lock on, fighting is good fun but still a challenging. You've got to be quite active with your inventory for recharging your shields and if you're getting into a fight with insufficient titanium or other oxides in your hold, you won't be able to recharge your shields and will get boned fairly swiftly.

The different alien races look different a feel different in how they communicate with you. Their languages, customs, wants and needs are all different. As are the spaceships. The alien races seem to fit into three broader categories of Trader, Explorer and Combat. The latter have the coolest looking ships IMO but, overall ship design is pretty imaginative. Finding crashed ships on planets is a good way (subject to RNG) to get upgrades for less than buying a ship at a space station but, you have to put the work in to repair the broken parts. Although repairing the key elements of the launch engines is easy enough. There is a process for finding crashed ships as well, using the right items at the right locations to find transmission towers picking up distress signals.

Ground combat is limited to fighting sentinels (which come in two flavours, easy flying orb things and ground based things that just fuck you up if you go toe to toe with em) or the occasional predatory creature (I've found one so far and that was underwater. Very cool though). Upgrading your multi-tool to have sufficient slots to run combat modules is something of a priority, especially as a decently upgraded boltcaster makes breaking into facilities much quicker  and you have to stop to fight sentinels less.
Private insurance gives the cheapest and best coverage to the well, and the most expensive and least coverage to the sick. This is a classic case of the Inverse Care Law - the poorest and most vulnerable need healthcare the most, but will get least access.

"One of the great tragedies of mankind is that morality has been hijacked by religion." - Arthur C Clarke

I find him an engaging conversationalist but I wouldn't say I was "into" him. - Thrugg

"You are the Darkness in which all life dies, my Lord."

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Re: No Man's Sky
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2016, 03:17:38 AM »
Everything I'm being told by my Steam friends is that this is a "wait for it to hit the bargain bin" purchase...


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Darkness

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Re: No Man's Sky
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2016, 03:45:16 AM »
I have also not heard good things about the PC version. Not sure where they went wrong with it but, I'm glad I had the foresight to get the PS4 version instead.

I would say that if you don't like sandbox games like Elite, then this isn't for you. Invariably the people giving this game low scores are the sort of people who don't like Elite, so there is definitely a marmite thing going on here.

In fact looking at the negative user reviews for NMS, they're awfully reminiscent of the negative reviews for Elite Dangerous. So, uhmm, yeah. Not terribly meaningful. I think the review on ctrl-alt-del captured it best, which in summary said that NMS is a brilliant and enjoyable experience, whilst also not being a very good game.
« Last Edit: August 15, 2016, 04:08:46 AM by Darkness »
Private insurance gives the cheapest and best coverage to the well, and the most expensive and least coverage to the sick. This is a classic case of the Inverse Care Law - the poorest and most vulnerable need healthcare the most, but will get least access.

"One of the great tragedies of mankind is that morality has been hijacked by religion." - Arthur C Clarke

I find him an engaging conversationalist but I wouldn't say I was "into" him. - Thrugg

"You are the Darkness in which all life dies, my Lord."

nanenj

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Re: No Man's Sky
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2016, 04:27:00 AM »
Copy pasta'd from Steam are my thoughts so far on the game.  Strange thing, I like Elite, but, i don't feel overpromised/under delivered on Elite.   You will notice that the PC version obviously suffers performance issues where it really shouldn't. 

Disappointing, doesn't have near the features that were originally claimed. There's no online play whatsoever. The beginning of the game is slow.

Speaking of which, the very first screen says 'Initialise' and is white, I sat there for a good 15 minutes not knowing this was a screen in which you had to hold a key to proceed further. I simply thought it was a loading screen.

The game does not perform well on my machine, I have a Geforce 860M with an SSD and 32gb of ram on an i7-4710HQ processor. It's stuttery and overall very disappointing.

I have not made it far due to performance issues and lack of context surrounding what you're supposed to, or even capable of doing. I've only put 0.4 hours onto the game, and am heavily considering requesting a refund. I'm hoping to endure a length of time to wait for the first patch, and then give it another try and see if things improve. But, given the cut features, the other reviews, and my personal experience so far, I've only managed to re-establish my rule of 'pre-ordering is for suckers'. I did cave and pre-order this game, I was so excited about it and I'm just disappointed.


Darkness

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Re: No Man's Sky
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2016, 04:42:26 AM »
Disappointing, doesn't have near the features that were originally claimed. There's no online play whatsoever. The beginning of the game is slow.

There has been a lot of uncertainty about NMS multiplayer at launch for a while now and the lack of it doesn't concern me. I'm in no rush to team up with people in space although I can see why it might bug others.

I keep seeing the comment that the beginning of the game being slow, but my experience was decidedly opposite of that. I'm wondering if this has something to do with the sort of world you spawn on and whether you're battling against the elements to survive whilst finding the stuff you need.

Speaking of which, the very first screen says 'Initialise' and is white, I sat there for a good 15 minutes not knowing this was a screen in which you had to hold a key to proceed further. I simply thought it was a loading screen.

I may also have done this......

I'm guessing I've sunk at least a dozen hours into the game since launch. I'm nowhere near bored of it.  My main gripe remains the space combat and things to do in space, as that side of the game feels very spartan right now. I'd also like to see a coherent map for each solar system, as the current mechanism of just randomly turning and pointing feels silly.
Private insurance gives the cheapest and best coverage to the well, and the most expensive and least coverage to the sick. This is a classic case of the Inverse Care Law - the poorest and most vulnerable need healthcare the most, but will get least access.

"One of the great tragedies of mankind is that morality has been hijacked by religion." - Arthur C Clarke

I find him an engaging conversationalist but I wouldn't say I was "into" him. - Thrugg

"You are the Darkness in which all life dies, my Lord."

Darkness

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Re: No Man's Sky
« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2016, 04:45:10 AM »
This particular news story on the patch to fix a number of issues made me giggle.

https://www.engadget.com/2016/08/12/upcoming-no-mans-sky-patch-will-fix-most-issues/

Quote
"The number of people players, and length of average play session, has been far more than our small team could have anticipated," said studio head Sean Murray in a post on the game's website. "That said, we're working quickly to adapt."

Apparently the team at Hello Games have never encountered gamers before or how much they will rabidly consume content.  :hammer:
Private insurance gives the cheapest and best coverage to the well, and the most expensive and least coverage to the sick. This is a classic case of the Inverse Care Law - the poorest and most vulnerable need healthcare the most, but will get least access.

"One of the great tragedies of mankind is that morality has been hijacked by religion." - Arthur C Clarke

I find him an engaging conversationalist but I wouldn't say I was "into" him. - Thrugg

"You are the Darkness in which all life dies, my Lord."

Pixelated

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Re: No Man's Sky
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2016, 05:48:29 AM »
I have also not heard good things about the PC version. Not sure where they went wrong with it but, I'm glad I had the foresight to get the PS4 version instead.

I would say that if you don't like sandbox games like Elite, then this isn't for you. Invariably the people giving this game low scores are the sort of people who don't like Elite, so there is definitely a marmite thing going on here.

In fact looking at the negative user reviews for NMS, they're awfully reminiscent of the negative reviews for Elite Dangerous. So, uhmm, yeah. Not terribly meaningful. I think the review on ctrl-alt-del captured it best, which in summary said that NMS is a brilliant and enjoyable experience, whilst also not being a very good game.

Yeah I dunno. The steam crowd I hang with are devoted fans of Elite. It's pretty universally loved.

NMS they are less enamored of. Though a few do like it a lot. And others are just put off by the total lack of anything approaching QA for the PC version.

I still want it. But not for anything close to the asking price. It's a $20 indie game masquerading as a $60 AAA title.


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Darkness

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Re: No Man's Sky
« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2016, 06:19:09 AM »
Yeah I dunno. The steam crowd I hang with are devoted fans of Elite. It's pretty universally loved.
Yeah, if the reviews are anything to go by, Elite Dangerous was about as much "universally loved" as NMS is.  And Elite Dangerous was not universally loved and yet, was better in every way than the original Elite. There are things that the original Elite does better than NMS but, that's mainly around space combat and those are minor changes that could be fixed by Hello.

I can see why people are complaining about the game whilst, at the same time, seeing the complaints as being utterly alien to my own experience with it.

NMS they are less enamored of. Though a few do like it a lot. And others are just put off by the total lack of anything approaching QA for the PC version.
Which would be why I didn't buy the PC version.
Don't get me wrong though, Hello Games shouldn't have released it for the PC with some many issues. They've done themselves and the game a massive disservice. Sadly it has become the norm in the modern online gaming media, to release a PC title and then "fix it" to make it playable some weeks later. Really not acceptable.

I still want it. But not for anything close to the asking price. It's a $20 indie game masquerading as a $60 AAA title.
Its definitely a AAA title, at least it is on the PS4. Hard to see how it could be considered a little indie title, when the game is so massive, so beautiful and offers so much to do.

But, definitely worth waiting for patching on the PC version, because it sounds like the experience is almost unplayable depending on your machine. A bit like Elite Dangerous after the Horizon's expansion hit really. It's why I stopped playing ED, as the game ran unplayablely slow on my machine. I need an upgrade. :(
Private insurance gives the cheapest and best coverage to the well, and the most expensive and least coverage to the sick. This is a classic case of the Inverse Care Law - the poorest and most vulnerable need healthcare the most, but will get least access.

"One of the great tragedies of mankind is that morality has been hijacked by religion." - Arthur C Clarke

I find him an engaging conversationalist but I wouldn't say I was "into" him. - Thrugg

"You are the Darkness in which all life dies, my Lord."

Sssith

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Re: No Man's Sky
« Reply #9 on: August 15, 2016, 11:46:09 AM »
I almost got this on the PC.  I am glad I didn't.  Is the PC version really behind that of platforms?  Also is are there any story lines in the game or is just time to go explore?

Darkness

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Re: No Man's Sky
« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2016, 12:58:00 AM »
Also is are there any story lines in the game or is just time to go explore?

There are two primary objectives in the game, reach the galactic core and unlock the atlas. The story develops as you work towards those objectives.
Private insurance gives the cheapest and best coverage to the well, and the most expensive and least coverage to the sick. This is a classic case of the Inverse Care Law - the poorest and most vulnerable need healthcare the most, but will get least access.

"One of the great tragedies of mankind is that morality has been hijacked by religion." - Arthur C Clarke

I find him an engaging conversationalist but I wouldn't say I was "into" him. - Thrugg

"You are the Darkness in which all life dies, my Lord."

Darkness

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Re: No Man's Sky
« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2016, 03:04:18 AM »
Patch 1.1 hit on sunday and added a shit-tonne of stuff to the game, as well making some changes to overall gameplay which I think have very much improved the experience.

I've not played with base building yet, as the abandoned bases I've found so far have been on planetary crapholes and I'm looking for a residence somewhere more clement. After pottering around for a few hours (NMS is such a great game for pottering) I finally decided (about 15mins before bed) to start grinding out the cash needed to buy a freighter. Having found a planet with gold reserves and an atmosphere that won't require intensive exo-suit management, I reckon about an hour's mining will pull in the 4million or so I need to buy a basic freighter. Ideally one that looks like a star destroyer. Then I can start researching useful stuff like mining modules to automate the gathering of resources from large nodes and also manufacture items necessary for collecting hazardous resources.

All that aside, the stand out changes in gameplay for me in normal mode are:

1 - More diversity in planets. Actually finding a planet with lush vegetation and abundant wildlife feels like an achievement in and of itself now. The planets feel more varied rather than being different due to superficial changes in what resources are available and how the algorithm for life forms has generated different shapes. The more lush worlds also have more buildings and locations to find, which again makes those planets feel special and worthwhile compared to the more desolate locations.

2 - The changes to the algorithm for terrain generation do make the more barren planets very compelling in their own way and give them a desolate beauty, a real feeling of isolation on an alien world. Unless they have a resource you particularly want, they are not places to stay for a long time.

3 - Changes to the algorithm for plants is making plant life more varied, which is welcome.

4 - Resource distribution - this is the biggest and most welcome change for me. Although the game will never completely screw you over on resources, important elements like Plutonium are not so nearly as abundant as they once were and should be hoarded and reserved exclusively for launch thruster use. No more freely using whatever element you had to hand to power your suit or multi-tool, as you'll be wanting to reserve carbon, power cells and thallium for those rather than plutonium. The overall redistribution means you have to put a bit of work into finding the resources you need, rather than just land and find everything is ready to collect in strolling distance from your ship.

5 - Making Iron available as a resource for powering your shields is a welcome addition for lowering the frustration of space combat, where the previous alternatives were a good deal harder to come by.

6 - Bounty targets in space provide a "point" to engaging in space combat beyond goodwill of alien races. Space combat is still lacklustre though and most combat situations can be resolved by kicking into reverse and having the enemies obligingly line up in front of your gun sights. NPC's joining in to help you when you get jumped by pirates is a nice addition and makes the galaxy feel a little more "alive."

7 - Changes to how finding planetside locations works means its no longer quite as formulaic for locating crashed ships and other places of interest. Which makes the exploring element of the game more......explorey.

Survival mode sounds quite.............challenging. The masochists are loving it apparently. Basically hardcore NMS with the difficulty ramped up.
Private insurance gives the cheapest and best coverage to the well, and the most expensive and least coverage to the sick. This is a classic case of the Inverse Care Law - the poorest and most vulnerable need healthcare the most, but will get least access.

"One of the great tragedies of mankind is that morality has been hijacked by religion." - Arthur C Clarke

I find him an engaging conversationalist but I wouldn't say I was "into" him. - Thrugg

"You are the Darkness in which all life dies, my Lord."

Melchior

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Re: No Man's Sky
« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2016, 10:05:15 PM »
Love the concept, but games like this never hold my attention =\

Does the game give much in terms of goal setting? or is it all freeform?
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Darkness

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Re: No Man's Sky
« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2016, 02:44:27 AM »
Much like Elite Dangerous, it is pretty freeform. There are two specific goals in the game 1- reach the galactic core and 2 - complete the path of the atlas but, you're free form in how to achieve those goals.

The introduction of base building and freighters provides focus for exploration in terms of shorter term goals and reasons to accrue money.

If you're not a fan of sandbox games, then NMS is unlikely to do much for you.
Private insurance gives the cheapest and best coverage to the well, and the most expensive and least coverage to the sick. This is a classic case of the Inverse Care Law - the poorest and most vulnerable need healthcare the most, but will get least access.

"One of the great tragedies of mankind is that morality has been hijacked by religion." - Arthur C Clarke

I find him an engaging conversationalist but I wouldn't say I was "into" him. - Thrugg

"You are the Darkness in which all life dies, my Lord."